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Questions or concerns? $50.00USD/per posting
Post Questions or concerns? $50.00USD/per posting
by Steve Tcherkezian on Tuesday, 31.January 2017 07:56 AM

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Re: How does keratin treatment act as a neutralizer?
Post Re: How does keratin treatment act as a neutralizer?
by Steve Tcherkezian on Tuesday, 24.January 2017 10:02 PM

Well, I had the same exact issue as well too with "Post a reply". When that happens, I switch from Explorer to Firefox or to Google Chrome, and that seems to work for me.

Once again the answer is a big YES - it is absolutely okay to use a neutralizer after Xtenso/TR, wash the hair and THEN apply the keratin treatment followed by flat ironing. And that is exactly what I do.


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Re: How does keratin treatment act as a neutralizer?
Post Re: How does keratin treatment act as a neutralizer?
by Steve Tcherkezian on Tuesday, 24.January 2017 03:15 PM

First of all - this so called “”Hybrid Japanese Hair Straightening and Brazilian/Keratin Treatment” has been in use for over 10 years, so it is not a new technology.

Second - the Brazilian Keratin Treatment does not replace the “Neutralizer” or act as a neutralizer. In fact, you can do Japanese Hair Straightening without using the “Neutralizer”. This is known as ‘Atmospheric oxidation”

For example, after ironing the hair section by section, and without applying the neutralizer is not a problem; the oxygen in the atmosphere will neutralize the perm/TR/Japanese Hair Straightening and reform the cystine/disulfide bonds. This takes 3 days, but you still need to ask the client not shampoo, sweat or wet her hair for 3 days. Keep in mind also that the neutralizing lotion acts as odor remover. So the best rule to follow is to always follow the manufactures direction. Meaning; best to use the neutralizing lotion.

Otherwise, here is why. Each time this woman shampoos her hair, her hair is going to have a nasty, skunk-like (thioglycolate) odor, and the odor persists. So even though all looks good in the video, and both, the client and stylist were pleased, nevertheless, I can assure you she must have brought this nasty odor to this stylist's attention.

The answer to your last question is a "yes"; it is perfectly fine not to rinse the Keratin Treatment and wait 3 days before shampooing the hair.


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Re: X-Tenso and hair colouring
Post Re: X-Tenso and hair colouring
by Steve Tcherkezian on Monday, 25.July 2016 05:35 PM

Hi Chiara,

Sorry, but I don't offer advice for people who are doing these processes at home.

LOOK, we stylists have enough problems doing chemical hair straightening, let alone doing it at home.

with regards to coloring the hair the same day, after a chemical hair straightening service - It is done right after the neutralizing lotion is rinsed.


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Re: X-tenso during pregnancy?
Post Re: X-tenso during pregnancy?
by Steve Tcherkezian on Monday, 02.May 2016 03:05 AM

Glad to be of some help, and good luck!


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Re: X-tenso during pregnancy?
Post Re: X-tenso during pregnancy?
by Steve Tcherkezian on Sunday, 01.May 2016 02:34 PM

First let’s talk about pregnancy. Typically, pregnant women's hormones fluctuate quite a bit during pregnancy and really don't normalize until after nursing is completed. Because hormones can cause some clients' hair to be very resistant to chemicals, the stylist must have a clear knowledge and pay special attention. End result, in the hands of a knowledgeable stylist, the results will be fine

Another thing that most pregnant women are not aware of; normally the hair sheds quite a bit after birth and sometimes after nursing. It's generally assumed that the hair does not shed as much during the pregnancy, therefore getting a little thicker. Post partum, the hair returns to its normal thickness, basically shedding off all the hair that didn't get shed in 9+ months. So if you straighten your hair, and then you start shedding a lot of hair, I wouldn't worry. I wouldn't think it was the chemical straightener at this point, but the natural shedding due to hormone balancing.

Regardless of what your stylist may say, Keratin Treatment contain formaldehyde, formalin or methylene glycol. I do not recommended doing Keratin Treatment during pregnancy. My advice is to go with X-Tenso.

If you decide to do X-Tenso, I recommend you wait 4 days instead of 2 or 3 days before wetting/shampooing your hair. Here is why. There are two different types of protein within the cortex of the hair. They are called either low sulphur proteins or high sulphur proteins. Low sulphur proteins are spring-like in shape and account for nearly 60% of the cortical protein. High sulphur proteins account for nearly 40% of the cortex. They can be thought of as “glue” which locks the “springs” in place. When hair is X-Tenso’d, the “glue” is softened and the springs move to a straightened form. The glue is then “hardened” to lock the springs into their new "straight" position. The “glue like” protein needs time to harden. Now during pregnancy, the ratio proportion of glue-like and coil-like may change. Therefore, it is best to wait 4 days before shampooing the hair. Thus, explaining why you should not wet or shampoo the hair for 4 days after the X-Tenso or CHI straightening service.


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Re: Post Xtenso - Fried Hair Patch
Post Re: Post Xtenso - Fried Hair Patch
by Steve Tcherkezian on Friday, 22.April 2016 06:39 PM

I recommend Redken's Extreme Shampoo, Allsoft Conditioner and Extreme Plus Treatment. This is what I recommend to the majorities of my clients with chemically treated hair.


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Re: Post Xtenso - Fried Hair Patch
Post Re: Post Xtenso - Fried Hair Patch
by Steve Tcherkezian on Friday, 22.April 2016 06:52 AM

Hi Sana

It’s not the sweating that is causing the issue.

There are two reasons which could be the culprit causing the hair near the nape area feel “extremely dry and rough”.

1) First, the majorities of stylists do not take the time to rinse the chemical (thioglycolate) thoroughly, especially, the nape section of head of hair (it is severe and excessive demand; very tiring and big strain on back of the stylist. Nevertheless, it must be done the correct way). Moreover, they do not change the towel with a fresh clean towel after initially rinsing the chemical from the hair. That is to say, there may still be traces of the chemical (thio) left on this section; hence causing the issues you are experiencing. To visualize what I am saying: When you lie back on the shampoo sink, inevitably the chemical is going to be transferred onto the towel near the nape area. If the stylist doesn’t change the towel and rinse thoroughly one more time, then as a result, you are going to have problems. Simple, isn’t it? BTW, L’Oreal Liss Shampoo and Masque is not going to fix it for you.

2) the neutralizing (chemical) lotion was not thoroughly rinsed from the nape section of head of hair, and if no towel changing with fresh clean towel; then it is as destructive to the hair as the scenario I described above.

3) The nape area is the most resistant section of head of hair, which means, it takes longer time to process, which also means, it may have been under-processed. That said, and according to your description, my experience tells me that your issue is #1, icluding #2 described above. That is to say, there is nothing you can do to fix this (extremely dry, rough) problem. You should leave it alone.


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LOOK - General info - Japanese & Keratin Hair Straightening
Post LOOK - General info - Japanese & Keratin Hair Straightening
by Steve Tcherkezian on Wednesday, 20.January 2016 05:05 PM

X-asperated by Frizzy, Curly, Wavy, or Unruly Hair?

A DAILY CONSTRAINT:

• Styling takes time
• Difficult to manage
• Too much volume
• Your hair appears sensitized and dull
… back to frizzy hair even after a smooth brushing.

WHEN CONFRONTED WITH THIS PROBLEM, WOMEN AND MEN WANT:

• To be able to style their hair more easily and quickly
• To reduce volume and relax curls
• Healthy, supple, shiny texture
• Lasting hold

THE SOLUTION: We have X-actly what you need!

Simply Smooth - Tame unruly texture for a smooth, easy-to-style look. The result is sleek, soft, frizz-free and controllable hair that stays smooth all day, every day, with minimal styling effort. Japanese Hair Straightening/TR can create wonderful effects. And it is a tribute to the skill of stylists and technicians that so many results are successful; despite all the complexity of the chemistry and science of Straightening.

"We are what we repeatedly do. Therefore excellence is not an action but a habit".
Aristotle - Greek philosopher.



Hi, my name is Steve Tcherkezian. I am a trained & highly qualified, highly skilled Japanese Hair Straightening/Thermal Reconditioning and Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening specialist in Toronto (GTA).

I have been doing Japanese Hair Straightening since 1999, Brazilian Keratin Treatment since 2005, and other conventional hair straightening for over 40 years. I am also a Trichoanalyst. Trichoanalysis is the scientific study of hair which allows a better understanding of the physical and microscopic properties of the hair.

Consultation - Is your stylist taking representative samples? Taking hair tests is extremely important in the overall results, and for all results to be valid, the hair test must be representative. Tests should never be taken from an area which will be cut or trimmed, no matter how damaged the hair may be. In such a case, the TR/BKT stylist would be analyzing damage that no longer remains a problem to the overall condition of your hair, thus receiving useless results.

Feature and Benefit of Japanese Hair Straightening - Basically the Japanese Hair Straightening/TR technology permanently straightens the hair and makes it soft, frizz-free and easy to style at-home. Of course new growth is new hair, so a touch-up is required once every 5 to 10 months; depending on the curl pattern your hair.

Japanese Hair Straightening/TR involves using chemical solutions… thioglycolate, oxidizers to change the inner shape (disulfide/cystine bonds) of the hair. Therefore, like any other perm, the strength must be appropriate to the hair condition. Clients with highlight/bleach treated hair or 20% highlights, or had their hair coloured with 30 volume peroxide are not a good candidate for Japanese Hair Straightening.

Feature and Benefit of Brazilian Keratin Treatment/BKT - Unlike the Japanese Hair Straightening, the Keratin Hair Straightening can be done on highlight/bleach treated hair. The Brazilian Keratin is designed for people who have curly or frizzy hair but dream of smooth, frizz-free locks. The Brazilian Keratin straightening is the perfect solution for people with curly, frizzy or unruly hair. It is a temporary solution that will last on your hair between three to four months. The Brazilian Keratin Treatment is the latest trend in hair straightening.

In Summary - Unqualified stylists in Japanese TR and Keratin Hair Straightening will eventually cause irreversible damage to the hair and hair follicle. A qualified and very experienced stylist in Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening and Japanese Hair Straightening/TR will deliver incredibly beautiful, silky, straight, frizz-free hair results.

So you say to yourself, "Where do I go from here?" When people return to the same stylist continuously, you know the stylist has done such a fantastic job. Simple isn’t it?

Viewing healthy hair after Japanese
and Keratin Hair Straightening.
(Magnified 200,000.00 times under
polarized light).



Viewing cuticle and cortex damage:
Improper Japanese and Keratin Hair
Straightening techniques. (Magnified
200,000.00 times under polarized light)
Naked eye cannot see.



Here is some of my Art Work:

Before Japanese Straightening
After

Before Japanese Straightening
After

Before Keratin Straightening
After

Before Japanese Straightening
After

Steve Tcherkezian
Japanese & Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening
(The Soft, Silky & Frizz-Free Hair Solution)
www.verticalsinhair.com
Contact Steve - Verticals in Hair
To contact Steve, you can either call or email him
Consultations by appointment only
Phone: (416) 669-9118
Email: steve@VerticalsInHair.com


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Re: Hair not straight after X-Tenso treatment
Post Re: Hair not straight after X-Tenso treatment
by Steve Tcherkezian on Wednesday, 13.January 2016 07:27 AM

As I said, pictures are of no help to determine the structural stability of your hair. If you decide you want to post it, I think it should be in a Jpeg format. Also, use the "Image" link above, which is located just under "Subject". If you are still having problems posting it, you can send it to my email address: steve@verticalsinhair.com


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Re: Hair not straight after X-Tenso treatment
Post Re: Hair not straight after X-Tenso treatment
by Steve Tcherkezian on Tuesday, 12.January 2016 07:55 AM

Oh my, what a disaster! in addition to all the list of mistakes your stylist has done, now you’re telling me your hair was highlight treated before she did the Japanese Hair Straightening/X-Tenso? This is yet another BIG no. You cannot, and shouldn’t do this process on highlight treated hair. To begin with, the instruction leaflet that accompany the product clearly says “Do not use X-Tenso on bleached or highlight treated hair”.

Forget Amway; stay with L’Oreal or Redken products.

Coloring your hair back to black or any other hair color will cause more damage. The most common alkaline agent used in hair color products is ammonia. In addition to maintaining stability of the dye intermediates, ammonia swells the hair strand, which helps the dye molecules penetrate the cuticle and cortex layers. Ammonia also acts as a catalyst to activate the hydrogen peroxide, which causes the oxidative dye molecules to couple and form. Keep in mind the absence of ammonia, or its odor, does not necessarily indicate a lowered pH level in the hair color formulation.

Hydrogen peroxide in combination with alkali source will break some of the disulfide bonds of the internal disulfide bonds found in the cortex of the hair. Disulfide bonds hold together certain protein chains within the hair fiber, and they are responsible for hair’s stability and strength. In a typical hair color process, approximately 10% of existing disulfide bonds are destroyed. In a high lift color or decolorizing process, 15 – 20% may be permanently broken. The destruction of disulfide bonds leads to the production of new molecule called cysteic acid. Unlike disulfide bonds, cysteic acid is not a cross-linked between protein chains of the cortex, so it weakens the overall structure of the hair.

And yeah, about the “Ammonia-Free" thing - It’s important to realize that for good deposit of hair color some alkalinity must be employed to soften the hair fiber to allow for penetration of the dye molecule. To enable a claim of no ammonia, hair color manufacturers simply use monoethanolamine (MEA) or some other similar alkali in place of ammonia to soften the hair fiber. That is to say, Different chemical; Same crap. If you know what I mean.

Matrix Opti.smooth and X-Tenso are very similar. That is to say, in the hands of a qualified and knowledgeable stylist they both produce great results. They both use Cationic Auto-Control technology (also known as Dithioglycolate). The thermal straightener (Japanese Hair Straightening/X-Tenso) is designed to limit the bond breakage by having a lot of dithio in the formula. During the reduction phase, the hair is fragile. It is at this stage that the Auto-Control/dithioglycolate technology intervenes. the Auto-Control active regulates the reduction and stabilizes the hair fiber structure by creating temporary links between the keratin chains. This of course "looks" Hi-Tech, but regardless of this Hi-Tech formulation; in the wrong hands it can still cause many problems.

The only option you may have at this juncture is to go with the Keratin Hair Straightening (also known as Brazilian Keratin Treatment/Straightening). That said, 1) First you need to go to a stylist for consultation 2) Give him a list of all the mistakes the other stylist had made. 3) And find a stylist that has great ironing skills. To do the Keratin Hair Straightening we use the iron set at 450°F. 450°F is about 232°C. Most irons reach 200°, not 232°C (392°F). First of all, dry hair proteins denature at 235 - 250°C so as long as the hair is dry, you are below the denaturation temperature. Plus hair is a bad conductor of heat so that you don't reach these temperatures on the hair. It takes a lot of ironing on dry hair to see structure changes.

Now, wet or damp hair is another thing. The denaturation temperature of the helical proteins drops as the matrix proteins are swollen and disrupted by water. A hot iron is now at a higher temperature than the denaturation temperature. With a little mistake here and there, you will permanently damage the hair's structure. The hair will gradually be straighter but rather lifeless.

Sending me a picture of your hair? In the hair straightening industry, a picture doesn’t tell me the exact structural stability and strength of your hair.


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Re: Hair not straight after X-Tenso treatment
Post Re: Hair not straight after X-Tenso treatment
by Steve Tcherkezian on Monday, 11.January 2016 03:39 PM

Let’s see what went wrong.

• The hair must be shampooed with a Hair Cleansing Shampoo, and not necessarily with a Mild shampoo. This is to Clarify and to remove copper, iron, hard water minerals and styling product build-up on all hair types; which allows smooth and even chemical penetration. Otherwise, you'll have uneven penetration, hence, unsuccessful results.

• X-Tenso reforming cream solution is applied on damp hair, so there is no need to iron the hair prior to applying the X-Tenso reforming cream solution.

• Leaving the X-Tenso solution for 20 minutes may not be enough time for bond breakage/transformation of the hair from curly to straight. That said, this is what exactly the majorities of stylists do; they follow the written instructions provided by the manufacturer. The right way of doing it goes beyond, far beyond the manufacturer’s instructions. Notwithstanding, manufacturers want to avoid liability.

Here is the right way of doing it: Since we can’t see molecules, the stylist must have a way of judging that the molecular rearrangement has taken place. This is done by taking a “strand test” to judge the degree of protein (hair) softening. When the protein has softened and moved sufficiently, it is judged to be completed and the solution is thoroughly rinsed from the hair. The key word here is movement. Softening alone is not sufficient, since the protein chains must move relative to one another to take on a new shape.

• In the practice of permanent hair straightening today, (such as X-Tenso) there are only two chemicals used for rebonding (neutralizing) disulfide bonds: hydrogen peroxide and sodium bromate. X-Tenso uses hydrogen peroxide.

Now that the hair is thoroughly rinsed, the disulfide bonds (or cystine) must be formed again-or rebounded-to lock the new straightness. The neutralizing lotion is generally left on the hair for 10 minutes, maximum . Here, she should have actually followed the manufacturer’s instructions, which clearly states "leave on 10 minutes".

If the neutralizing remains longer, more cysteic acid (a product formed in the hair from attack of peroxide on the disulfide bond) will be formed and the hair may change color. Besides, if the neutralizing solution remains on the hair for a longer period of time, it can break down the disulfide bonds it has formed. Clearly – the hair becomes confused and takes on an undesirable shape… straight here… curly and frizzy there, hair breakage here and there, and with undesirable results; as you are experiencing.

• She rinsed the hair with cold water? This is a BIG no, because it would “lock” the chemical solution inside the hair, and the hair becomes totally confused. In the industry, we refer to this as “Mixed disulfide” (a compound formed in the hair when a molecule of straightening agent is attached to a molecule of cysteine. This in effect attaches the straightening solution agent to the protein structure). Moreover, every time you shampoo your hair, your hair will have a nasty, skunk-like or cat urine-like odor, which is not pleasant at all.

• Contrary to what your stylist had said, Matrix is not made by L’Oreal. Matrix was bought by L’Oreal. She should have used a dedicated neutralizing lotion.

So where do you go from here? Japanese Hair Straightening (also known as X-Tenso Smoothing Service or Rebonding) transforms your curly, wavy, frizzy hair into – soft, silky, shiny, straight hair, but unfortunately that did not happen to your hair. Under my qualified hands it can be fixed. Otherwise, you need to find a stylist who understands the science behind their art. Or else, you have a recipe for disaster.


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LOOK - Why do people experience hair breakage, hair loss issues after Japanese Hair Straightening
Post LOOK - Why do people experience hair breakage, hair loss issues after Japanese Hair Straightening
by Steve Tcherkezian on Monday, 04.January 2016 10:54 AM

Japanese Hair Straightening/TR can create wonderful effects. And it is a tribute to the skill of stylists and technicians that so many results are successful; despite all the complexity of the chemistry and science of Straightening.


Causative factors of hair loss, hair breakage and “L” shaped bends after Japanese Hair Straightening.

Cosmetic procedures such as the Brazilian/BKT and Japanese/TR, do not damage the hair follicle within the scalp, and so do not cause hair loss. Only a serious heat to the skin of the scalp and/or applying the thio cream solution on the scalp that destroys the follicle cells can do so. Therefore the cream solution must not touch the scalp and the heat must be handled carefully at all times. But take an enthusiastic amateur embarking doing Japanese Hair Straightening/TR without any basic knowledge or experience, and combine this with a ceramic iron used on its hottest setting; you have a recipe for disaster.

Temporary hair loss, hair breakage after Japanese Hair Straightening; using X-Tenso or any other hair straightening brand, such as Straight Tio, Shiseido Crystallizing, iStraight, Liscio, Yuko etc. The table below shows some problems that can arise by allowing unqualified stylists doing Japanese Hair Straightening/TR.

Culprit #1: The hair straightening cream was applied to scalp or seeped onto the scalp.

Culprit #2: Some stylists use heat source, steam or air producing machines while the thio cream is on the hair. This method can singe the hair; causing hair breakage and hair loss. Basically these machines produce heat to accelerate the process. This of course "looks" Hi-Tech but as I said, the heat process device can cause severe damage to the hair.

Culprit #3: The stylist used broken combs or the comb had sharp ridges in between the tooth of the comb.

Culprit #4: The solution was left on the hair longer than required; hence over-processed and as a result, causing hair breakage.

Culprit #5: Chemical hair straightening (cream solution) rinsing step. Once the hair has reached its desired configuration, the straightening cream is rinsed from the hair. It is necessary to remove unreacted chemicals from the hair. This is why most manufacturers recommend a three to five minutes rinsing time. If not, the hair becomes confused; causing hair breakage.

Culprit #6: Some stylists pull the hair with excessive force during the ironing, or the heat from the iron was above 180° degrees Celsius.

Ideally, we dry the hair down to 80% or so and now we iron. Now wet or damp hair is another thing. If there hair is wet (less than 80% dry), the denaturation temperature of the helical proteins drops as the matrix proteins are swollen and disrupted by water. A hot iron is now at a higher temperature than the denaturation temperature. With repeated applications, you will permanently damage the hair's structure. The hair will become rather lifeless; causing severe hair breakage and/or hair loss. Why hair loss? Because the steam of the iron shoots in both directions: towards the stylist’s fingers and worst of all, towards the direction of the scalp; causing trauma to the hair follicle. If the follicle is damaged, topical products are not likely to help.

Culprit #7: The stylist did not follow the manufacturer's instructions. The neutralizing lotion stayed on the hair longer than the manufacturer’s instructions.

In the practice of permanent hair straightening today, such as Japanese Hair Straightening, there are only two chemicals used for rebonding (neutralizing) disulfide bonds: hydrogen peroxide and and sodium bromate If the neutralizing lotion remains on the hair for a long period of time, it can break down the disulfide bonds it has formed to create a new compound called "cysteic acid". CYSTEIC ACID is a product formed on the hair from attack of peroxide on the disulfide bond.

Culprit #8: Neutralizing Lotion (oxidizer) rinsing step. It is necessary to remove unreacted chemicals from the hair. This is why most manufacturers recommend a three to five minutes rinsing time.

I know the following description is complicated, but try to reason it through. Once the straightening solution penetrates the cuticle layers, it moves into the softer cortex very quickly. How quickly? That depends on hair type. Since we can’t see molecules, the stylist must have a way of judging that the molecular rearrangement has taken place. This is done taking a stretch “test” to judge the degree of protein softening. The alpha helical coils of the keratin (hair) can be stretched up (35 – 45%) and will return to their natural resting state like a spring which is pulled and then allowed to return to its original position. If helical coils have been deformed (over-processed), it can no longer return to their original state. This would be like pulling the spring beyond its capacity. The spring can no longer return to its original or normal state.

The key word here is movement. Softening alone is not sufficient. When the protein has softened and moved sufficiently, it is judged to be completed and the straightening solution is rinsed from the hair.

So what exactly happens when the stylist applies the reforming thioglycolate cream solution, such as X-Tenso, Straight Tio, Shiseido Crystallizing, Yuko, Liscio etc., on your hair?

There is one important thing to realize when discussing Japanese Hair Straightening/Thermal Reconditioning/TR solutions, such as X-Tenso. The active ingredient is the same in all of them, "ammonium thioglycolate". If the thio (X-Tenso) activator is applied to the scalp, it can cause reduction (permanent hair reduction is defined as the long-term, stable reduction in the number of hairs re-growing). Solution that has seeped onto the scalp or applied on the scalp is the primary, though not the only cause of hair breakage and hair loss.

Ammonium Thioglycolate is the basic chemical used in salon hair straightening.(Thioglycolate is the chemical most frequently used in alkaline hair straightening, such as Japanese Hair Straightening. It has the ability to break or rearrange disulfide bonds within the hair). It opens the cystine/disulfide cross-link to soften the hair’s protein; hence to change the shape memory of the hair – permanently. In order for the straightening to work, the active thioglycolate compounds, such as X-Tenso, must penetrate the hair fiber completely and reach the disulfide bonds.

First of all, Japanese Hair Straightening, all brands, including X-Tenso is not meant to be used on highlight treated hair. It is a dangerous proposition. If the highlighted area is localized, for example at the front, then this area should be isolated, and that will defeat the purpose of doing X-Tenso because you’ll end up with two different textures of hair.

Cystine/disulfide bond is the most prominent amino acid found upon analysis of the hair. This is the disulfide amino acid which cross-links protein chains and gives it stability. It is the site of molecular rearrangement during permanent hair straightening, such as Japanese Hair Straightening. The first barrier to this penetration are 8 – 12 cuticle layers which surrounds the softer cortex structure.

Not all disulfide bonds are broken (50-75% are not). If they were, the protein chains would no longer be connected, and the hair would dissolve. In fact, depilatories contain thioglycolate solution at very high pH to do just that. Depilatories like Neet or Nair are based on thioglycolate and these thio containing products should never be applied to the scalp.

Disulfide bonds hold together certain protein chains within the hair fiber, and they are responsible for hair's stability and strength. In a typical hair straightening process, approximately 15 - 20% may be permanently broken, so it weakens the overall structure of the hair. Although this is an inevitable side effect, it is perfectly okay, and an appropriate protein/moisture balance can be achieved through proper hair care treatment.

Here is what actually happens: First, the hair swells. For example, if your hair’s diameter is 80 microns, it could swell up to 83 microns, and the cuticles are raised. This is to allow chemical penetration.

The second thing to remember is that when that cream is on the hair, the hair is in a weakened state, and the hair is in a vulnerable condition. Excessive manipulation of the “swelled” weakened hair can cause breakage and/or severe breakage.

I often hear people talk about 90 degree “L” shaped bends. There are two type of bends:

1. Chemical bend - Bends are caused by sloppy application of the thio solution too close to the scalp. You get a "crimp" in your hair right at the roots. An experienced stylist will apply the solution a fraction of half an inch or an inch away from your scalp. This takes time and patience, most stylists do not bother with such tedious details.

2. Mechanical bend: Ironing technique, when ironing it is important to maintain even tension in both hands that is guiding the section as well as the hand working the iron. Using uneven tensions with the iron or taking thick vertical sections or wide horizontal sections or if the hair is not dried to a precise dryness; it will cause ridges/bend in the hair and can singe the hair. The only thing that you can do to avoid the bends is to go to an experienced stylist.

Before ironing, the stylist should be prepared to blow-dry the hair 80 to 85% before starting the ironing process. The more moisture left in the hair at the time of flat ironing, the more dramatic the effect of the physical straightening, but this should be carefully assessed as the heat of the iron is stressful to the hair. If the hair has slight wave near the root, the hair should be ironed when it is approximately 70 to 75% dry – the combination of the moisture/steam and the heat of the iron will make the hair completely straight.

Ironing is done horizontally at 45° angle from scalp all the way to the ends. The crown area is ironed upward at 90° from the scalp for about 3 to 4 inches and then at 45° angle from the scalp all the way to the ends. Once all the sections are completely ironed, the stylist should go through the whole head of hair vertically at 45° angle from scalp to ends. Another technique is to do the back section at 0° angle from scalp to ends. The above technique ensures a “Straight” finish.

HAIR DAMAGE - The structure of the damaged hair is considered "disordered". Internally, the fibrils of the cortex may be separated in spots causing hair to be weak and over-porous.

Damage to the cortex can be caused in number of ways. Styling tools such as a blow-dryer used too close to the hair or left on too long can actually melt the cortex. Improper use of chemical hair straightening products, lighteners, tints and over exposure to the sun and chlorine can also damage the hair, the result: weakened, dry brittle and dull-looking hair.

Usually if the cortex is damaged, the cuticle has been damaged too.

A damaged or “abraded” cuticle is often the result of mechanical friction to the fiber. Wet-brushing and combing with broken comb or combs that have ridges in between the tooth of the comb, towel-drying, repeated use of thermal styling equipment, improper cutting techniques, teasing, braiding, use of rubber bands and tight hair clips all cause breakage of the cuticle scales.

“Split ends” are another form of damage. They start as cracks in the cuticle which eventually deepen and break or “fray”. If split ends aren’t cut off, the splits increase and the ends become completely frayed. It is to your advantage to recondition damaged hair and maintain its competency.



Cuticle scales.
(Hair magnified 200,000 times)



Healthy compact cuticle.
(Hair magnified 200,000 times)



Broken cuticle scales due
to bad Japanese Hair
Straightening techniques and
over pressing with the iron.
(Hair magnified 200,000 times)



Broken hair caused by
bad Japanese Straightening
techniques.
(Hair magnified 200,000 times)



What about hair breakage after Keratin Hair Straightening (Also known as Brazilian Hair Straightening/Brazilian Blowout)?

The main culprit will depend on the ironing skills and application techniques of the stylist doing the job. The Keratin product should not be applied directly on the scalp because it can cause plugged hair follicles; it creates a barrier that inhibits and restrains the scalp from releasing moisture and perspiration. As a results, these body fluids cannot properly evaporate and become concentrated, creating a condition at the scalp which is conducive to hair breakage and loss of hair.

To do the Brazilian, we use 450°F, which is about 232°C. Most irons reach 200°, not 232°C (392°F). First of all, dry hair proteins denature at 235 - 250°C so as long as the hair is dry, you are below the denaturation temperature. Plus hair is a bad conductor of heat so that you don't reach these temperatures on the hair. It takes a lot of ironing on dry hair to see structure changes.

Now wet or damp hair is another thing. The denaturation temperature of the helical proteins drops as the matrix proteins are swollen and disrupted by water. A hot iron is now at a higher temperature than the denaturation temperature. If the hair is not completely dry, it will permanently damage your hair's structure. The hair will gradually be straighter but rather lifeless, and a result, you will experience hair breakage.

What about cowlicks? Almost everyone has cowlicks. If not on the forehead/hair line, then it is in other surrounding areas of head of hair. Since cowlicks are based on the direction the hair follicles are faced, and not on the curl pattern of the hair, your stylist may or may not have noted that the hair follicles are facing upwards or sideways which would direct the hair in a difficult-to-control position. You might end up with a corner of stick straight hair shooting upwards and you would have to really work at getting them to lay down and evenly distributed across. If the hair was straightened, but the stylist was to process it against the direction of the follicle, the hair would get a 90 degree bend at the roots and most likely break off. If the hair did not break off, and the 90 degree angle grew out, you would have a strange bend in the hair which looks very unnatural.

Abnormal hair loss and hair breakage There are some other facts that contribute to abnormal hair loss such as pregnancy, birth control pills, medication, anesthetics, traction, trauma, alopecia, crash diet and age.

Scientific tests prove that antibiotics and other medications administered internally will reach the hair shaft in approximately 48 to 72 hours and will be present throughout the hair shaft in about 12 days. Antibiotics or other types of medications present in the hair shaft, will react with the chemical services, causing unwanted chemical reactions and breakage to occur, which may be detrimental to the processing and perfection of all chemical services, such as colour, highlights, Japanese Hair Straightening Therefore, it is imperative to inform your stylist about the intake of strong medications.

Hope this helps.


Steve Tcherkezian
Japanese & Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening
(The Soft, Silky & Frizz-Free Hair Solution)
www.verticalsinhair.com
Contact Steve - Verticals in Hair
To contact Steve, you can either call or email him
Consultations by appointment only.
Phone: (416) 669-9118.
Email: steve@VerticalsInHair.com


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LOOK - Structure of hair. A closer look
Post LOOK - Structure of hair. A closer look
by Steve Tcherkezian on Friday, 01.January 2016 09:00 AM

A CLOSER LOOK AT HAIR.

Human hair is divided into two basic parts: hair root and hair shaft. The root is found beneath the surface of the skin. In the root area, the hair grows up through a tube-like depression called a follicle. At the bottom of the follicle is the papilla, where hair is formed and melanin is created. This is considered the “living” part of hair, where growth and regeneration of cells occur and blood and nerves exist.

Structure of the Hair Shaft


The cuticle is the most resistant part of the hair. Cuticle proteins do not stretch and are more brittle than the cortical proteins. In fact, as the hair is stretched the cuticle will actually crack before the cortex breaks. It is important to teach “at-home maintenance” to prevent this damage from occurring.

The cuticle - If you stack some paper drinking cups inside one another, the top edges of the cup would represent the cuticle layers as they overlap. This type of overlapping arrangement is called imbrications, and they normally lie flat. The cuticle layers point toward the end of the hair shaft. They cannot be seen by the naked eye but they can be felt. If you slide your fingers along a dry hair from the end towards the scalp, the hair will feel sticky or rough; you are sliding your fingers against the cuticle and are lifting the imbrications/cuticle scales. Top

The cortex or centre portion of the hair strand lies beneath the cuticle. It looks like the spiral on the back of a notebook. One tiny fiber, a micro fibril and macro fibril will coil around other fibers to make a larger micro fibril. These fibers coil around each other to create the cortex. This spiral structure, much like a rope or yarn, makes the hair extremely strong and gives it elasticity.

The visible part, or hair shaft is non-living keratin divided into three layers: cuticle, cortex and medulla (The medulla, when present, is the innermost layer running down the middle of the hair shaft. In humans, it has no known function).

There are 22 amino acids, though only 19 of them are found in the keratin protein of the hair and 17 found in the collagen protein structure of the skin. Amino acids link together in a specific order and arrangement to create proteins. Although amino acids are all proteins, each protein is different because of the way it is put together. Amino acids link or bond together, end-to-end, to form larger groups of amino acid chains that are commonly referred to as peptide or poly-peptide chains.

When you consider that there are only 10 numbers which make up every phone in the world…the endless opportunity for different combinations of the 22 amino acid molecules is easier to comprehend.

There are three different bonds that link or join amino acids together side by side to form three-dimensional structure.

These bonds include:

• Hydrogen Bonds
• Salt Bonds
• Disulfide Bonds

Each of these bonds behaves differently, and serves a different purpose in building the structure of hair.

Hydrogen Bonds - These bonds work on the principle that unlike charges attract. Hair has many hydrogen bonds, and they tend to be weak and break apart easily when exposed to water or heat. They serve to organize the proteins, and make up about 35% of the hair’s resistance to change. So, they keep naturally curly hair in its curly form.

Salt Bonds - Like hydrogen bonds, the salt bonds work on the principle that unlike charges attract too. The salt bonds are largely affected by changes in pH and by water and make up another 35% of the hair’s resistance to change.
When the hair is “set”, for example, both the salt and hydrogen bonds are affected by the application of water along with the tension of rollers or brushes in conjunction with the evaporation of water as the hair dries. This allows for a “set” of changes, which affect these salt and hydrogen bonds that are not permanent.

Disulfide/Cystine Bonds - The most prominent amino acid found upon analysis of the hair. This is the disulfide amino acid which cross-links protein chains and gives hair stability. It is the site of molecular rearrangement during permanent straightening, such as Japanese Hair Straightening.

When we give Japanese Hair Straightening/TR service, the reducing agent (thioglycolate) actually breaks down the disulfide bond, and cuts the cystine in half to create two cysteines. These are later re-bonded through a chemical action to re-create cystine. The disulfide bond is responsible for giving hair its stability and strength.

This process of bonding amino acids together happens countless times over to produce the living tissues and appendages of our bodies. Of great interest to us in this discussion is the protein composition of the hair. This fibrous structure is composed of three different types of keratin protein.

• The Cortex - Formed by spiraling or helical protein chains, which are immersed in a bed of amorphous proteins. The cortex or middle layer is composed of softer, more pliable spiraling chains of protein, which give hair its strength and elasticity.

• The Cuticle - Flat platelets of hardened keratin. The cuticle is the translucent, outermost portion of keratin that protects the inside of the hair shaft. It is generally seven to ten layers thick, with scales that overlap each other like shingles on a roof.

• The Glyco-proteins - A highly sticky or glue-like form of keratin that literally holds the cuticle and cortical fibers together.

Tiny microscopic strands of keratin protein begin to twist and wrap together to form protofibrils. These in turn connect and twist to form microfibrils, which twist around each other to create macrofibrils; the basic structure of the cortex of the hair. The cortex is then covered with hard plates of cuticle scales. The nature of this springy form of composition gives the human hair its tremendous flexibility to stretch and return to the original shape without damage.

Our bodies are true marvels of science. Beyond just producing the protective layers of skin and hair, the body creates a natural defense system to protect against the harmful elements and external bacteria.

Within the skin and attached to the hair follicle openings are sebaceous glands that produce sebum, or oil and moisture glands that produce the body’s perspiration or sweat. The natural secretions mix to form an emulsified coating on the surface of the skin that distributes up on the hair fiber, called the ACID MANTLE. The acid mantle maintains the body’s natural surface acid balance of pH 4.5-5.5

This illustration shows how tiny microscopic strands of keratin protein begin to twist and wrap together to form protofibrils. These in turn connect and twist to form microfibrils, which twist around each other to create macrofibrils, the basic structure of the cortex of the hair. The cortex is then covered with hard plates of cuticle scales. The nature of this springy form of composition gives the human hair its tremendous flexibility to stretch and return to the original shape without damage.





Steve Tcherkezian
Japanese & Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening
(The Soft, Silky & Frizz-Free Hair Solution)
www.verticalsinhair.com
Contact Steve - Verticals in Hair
To contact Steve, you can either call or email him
Consultations by appointment only.
Phone: (416) 669-9118.
Email: steve@VerticalsInHair.com


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Re: Botched Xtenso hair straightening
Post Re: Botched Xtenso hair straightening
by Steve Tcherkezian on Thursday, 31.December 2015 02:08 PM

Hi Harshvardhan.

Good student, though I feel you should have done a much better job finding an expert. I know, I know, they all claim to be experts, isn’t it?

As you may know, when people actually lose their hair, it is my opinion that the follicle is damaged through excessive pulling and traction as well as the chemical depilatory action of softening the hair with Thioglycolate. Depilatories like Neet or Nair are based on Thioglycolate and these Thio containing Japanese Hair Straightening/TR products, such as X-Tenso, should never be applied to the scalp. We know that hair grows back after a depilatory so there must be other action on the follicle. I suspect it's a combination of the longer time on the hair, the traction and perhaps the heat increasing penetration.

It’s good you went to see a Dermatologist, but I doubt if carbonyl iron and the vitamin tablet will have any positive effects. Personally, I wouldn’t because it may have adverse effects. Nature will take its time to heal this ordeal, and the hair loss will eventually stop, with or without these vitamins.

Not sure which Extreme Strength Builder you have ordered. I like Extreme Strength Builder + (it comes in a jar, and not the one that comes in a tube).

X-Tenso is available in Canada, and I use it some of the time. Now, whether it is WellaStrate, Glatt, X-Tenso or any other brand; there is nothing wrong with these products. But since X-Tenso seems to be very popular in India, I really think L’Oreal should offer better training. You have way too many issues using X-Tenso in India.

As I said, I really believe the hair loss will stop. Give it some time. Don’t stress yourself. Let me know in a month or two.

In the meantime, try to entertain yourself and read my new “LOOK” heading postings.


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LOOK - Do not confuse shedding with hair breakage or hair loss
Post LOOK - Do not confuse shedding with hair breakage or hair loss
by Steve Tcherkezian on Thursday, 31.December 2015 12:06 PM

You need to know about the stages of the hair cycle in order to understand many of the problems people have with their hair. Each individual hair is formed inside a hair bulb deep in a hair follicle. The follicle is a tiny but powerful factory, which throughout many people's lifetime hardly ever stops working. Finally the hair spontaneously falls out. The follicle rests for a little while, and then starts to produce yet another new hair.

Shedding is part of the normal process of the replacement of old hair with new. The new hair emerges from the same opening at the surface of the scalp as the old one, and then the hair cycle begins again.

This is the hair cycle - The anagen (the growing phase) phase of a new hair starts at the moment it begins to grow; active growth in the hair bulb. Catagen (the intermediate phase) is a short resting phase. The telogen (the shedding phase) is the time at which a new hair begins to grow from the hair follicle. As it grows upwards the old hair will be shed naturally or may be pulled out, which happens easily and painlessly. These are the hairs that come out when you shampoo or brush your hair.

The hair loss is not permanent as long as the roots have not been damaged. In some older people the hair cycle becomes shorter, the follicles gradually give up producing long, strong hair, and the hairs become thinner and shorter. If sudden, extensive hair loss occurs, medical attention should be sought immediately.

Hair growth and nourishment - There are three phases of hair growth starting with the anagen “living or growing phase”. At least 85% of hair on a normal healthy scalp are said to be in the anagen phase at any given time and have a normal life of two to six years. The catagen “resting phase” is a transitional stage, the bulb’s cellular activity slows down as it approaches a complete resting phase. The final phase of the bulb’s life cycle is a complete resting stage called telogen “falling phase” these are the hairs that normally fall out and are often found in the brush or on the pillow.

This shedding, or “old” hair is being loosened in the follicle to make way for “new” hair to grow. So the hairs that fall out are replaced rather quickly by long-lived new hair. It is not necessarily damage from TR that causes you to have those little short hairs at the part or all over a head of hair. Hair has a life cycle - you are always losing some and then it starts to re-grow. When your hair is super straight, you notice the new (short) hair more. With curly hair, it gets hidden. Most authorities believe that loss of 80-100 hairs per day is natural.

Normal hair shedding - A certain amount of hair is shed daily. This is nature’s method of making way for new hair. The average daily shedding is estimated at 50 to 80 hairs. Hair loss beyond this estimated average may indicate scalp or hair trouble.

In human beings, new hair replaces old hair in the following ways:

1) The bulb loosens and separates from the papilla.
2) The bulb moves upward in the follicle.
3) The hair moves slowly to the surface, where it is shed.
4) The new hair is formed by cell division that takes place at a point at the root of the hair and around the papilla.

The exact life span of the hair will range from two to six years. Other factors, such as sex, age, type of hair, heredity and health will affect the hair growth.

Hair cycle - The formation and growth of hair cells depend on proper nourishment and oxygen which only the bloodstream can supply. Therefore, the function of blood is indispensable to the health and life of hair. When the body is healthy, hair flourishes. If the body is ill, hair weakens. When the bloodstream provides the hair papilla with food elements, the hair grows.

Normal hair growth - The average growth of healthy hair on the scalp of an adult is about one half to three quater inch per month. Research indicates that the hair may grow faster in the case of younger people, and in some instances, may even grow up to three-quarters of an inch per month. The growth of scalp hair occurs more rapidly between the ages of 15 and 30, and declines sharply between 50 and 60. Scalp hair grows faster in women than in men.

Permanent hair straightening/TR, Keratin Hair Straightening, bleaching and coloring, all damage the hair to some extent. Permanent hair straightening products by its nature disrupts the structure of the hair. it has to do so for the perm to be successful. In order to change the shape of the hair, permanent straightening agents first break the disulfide bonds that give the hair shaft its structure. The hair is then put into its new shape and neutralized. Neutralization is the name given to the re-forming of the chemical bonds in their new positions, a process that fixes the hair permanently into its new shape.

The secrets of satisfactory hair straightening lie in the manufacturer's formulation of the product and the stylist's expertise in applying the neutralizing lotion after just the right length of time, so that the perm is fixed but the hair is damaged as little as possible. Japanese Hair Straightening should always look beautiful in spite of this deliberate damage.

Bleaching and dyeing change hair structure too, because the dyes and the bleaches used have to penetrate the cuticle and get into the cortex where they have their effect. Some degree of chemical damage is unavoidable.

Cosmetic procedures do not damage the hair follicle within the scalp, and so do not cause hair loss. Only a serious chemical burn to the skin of the scalp that destroys the follicle cells can do so. Burns like this can follow indiscriminate over-use of permanent hair straightening solutions, and therefore these solutions must be handled carefully at all times.

Japanese Hair Straightening/TR process inexpertly applied is probably the most damaging chemical treatment that hairdressers see. If the cuticle scales on the hair have been lifted up and separated from each other they will never return to normal, and as soon as a comb passes over them they may break off. The cuticle may be completely stripped off, revealing the cortex underneath. This too is now exposed to weathering, and will probably not survive unbroken for long.

When a new client walks into a salon, the hairdresser never knows what problems are going to face them. A quick assessment reveals whether the client is Caucasian, African, or Asian descent: all these characteristics interact with each other. And then, what is the past history of this hair? Has it been straightened or bleached, or possibly both? No two clients are the same. Life in a salon is never dull!

Just as a doctor takes a 'history' of a new patient in the surgery, so the stylist looks at the history of a client's hair and examines its condition, in particular whether there is evidence that it has been chemically treated previously. The doctor can only decide what can be done for the patient once that history is known and understood. In the same way, the most expert stylist can only decide what is or is not possible after that examination has been made.

Pregnancy related post-partum alopecia - This is temporary type of hair loss often noted two to three month after termination of a pregnancy. It can last from three months to a year, averaging about six months. The hair loss will be more noticeable in some women than others. In fact, some women have noted that the amount of loss and duration of the hair loss differed with each pregnancy.

Typically, pregnant women's hormones fluctuate quite a bit during pregnancy and really don't normalize until after nursing is completed. Because hormones can cause some client’s hair to be very resistant to chemicals, I caution people to wait until after nursing. It can be done, but there are certain things you need to know. Please read my daughter’s post here.

Another thing that most pregnant women are aware of, normally the hair sheds quite a bit after birth and sometimes after nursing. It's generally assumed that the hair does not shed as much during the pregnancy, therefore getting a little thicker. After wards, the hair returns to its normal thickness, basically shedding off all the hair that didn't get shed in 9+ months.

Armed with the language, we educate ourselves on certain subjects where we learn the fundamentals and disciplines related to hair. When we find a subject appealing, we want to learn more than just the basics, more than the fundamentals. We learn the disciplines, the proper mechanics, and we discipline ourselves to do it correctly. In essence, in order to master the subject, we do whatever it takes to own the information.

So, you say to yourself - Where do I go from here? I understand the language, and now I know how to take better care and to create beautiful hair, based on hair that is in optimum condition. Simple, isn’t it?



Steve Tcherkezian
Japanese & Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening
(The Soft, Silky & Frizz-Free Hair Solution)
www.verticalsinhair.com
Contact Steve - Verticals in Hair
To contact Steve, you can either call or email him
Consultations by appointment only.
Phone: (416) 669-9118.
Email: steve@VerticalsInHair.com


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LOOK - pH, what does it mean to you?
Post LOOK - pH, what does it mean to you?
by Steve Tcherkezian on Thursday, 31.December 2015 11:06 AM

We’ve heard of pH. We’ve seen pH’s written for solutions and products. Just what is pH and how is it related to what we do within the professional beauty industry?

Prior to 1960’s, only two groups of individuals were particularly interested in pH, medical professionals and farmers. The pH of one’s blood is extremely important to doctors and nurses, a minor change can quickly lead to severe medical emergencies. Farmers have learned that certain plant grow and produce better in soil of certain pH’s.

Yet what does pH mean? The letters are abbreviated for potential Hydrogen. Simply explained, a given pH is a reading (unit of measurement) of positive hydrogen ions compared to negative hydroxyls in an aqueous (water) containing solution. Just as degrees measure temperature, and inches distances, pH numbers measure the amount of acid or alkali in a water based solution. Keep in mind that only solutions containing water and products that dissolve in water can have pH value.

Hair care products that are based on the scientific principles of hair and skin as well as proven evidence that when carefully formulated, such topically applied proteins and moisturizers can be absorbed into the hair and skin to produce long-term improvements or conditioning. The revelation enabled salon professionals to condition hair internally rather than just camouflage the damage. The result: long term strengthening of the hair fiber, which improves, in part, the look and durability of perms, hair color and Thermal Reconditioning/Japanese Hair Straightening. This phenomenon of using applied science to products and services performed in salons and at-home has forever changed product formulation in both the professional and retail sector of the beauty industry.

pH refers to whether a product is alkaline or acidic and is as important to a hairstylist as Rx is to a doctor or pharmacist. The scale ranges from 0.0 having the highest concentration of acid, to 14.0 having the least. Pure water is at the middle of the pH scale and has equal parts of acidity and alkalinity. So it is neutral. The hair itself has no pH since it is solid, but the protective mantle of the hair has a pH that ranges from 4.5 to 5.5 on the scale.

Anything that you apply to the hair that is below 4.5 will act as an acid; it will harden, constrict and shrink the hair. Anything that you apply to the hair above 5.5 will act as an alkali; soften, swell and expand the hair and change the interior. Therefore, always ensure that the protective pH 4.5 to 5.5 has been returned.

The measurement of pH is very important because the largest external organs on the human body, the skin, hair and nails are mildly acidic. Human hair is at its greatest strength, luster and flexibility when the average acid mantle is between pH 4.5 to 5.5. Likewise, our skin is softer and more resilient when it falls within a pH range of 4.5 to 5.5.

Scientifically formulated shampoos, conditioners and treatments, can give hair the beautiful shine, body and resilience of healthy hair, and dramatically improve its outer appearance. Look for hair care products that are acid-balanced. Redken hair care products are formulated with a mildly acidic pH of 4.5 to 5.5 to be compatible with the acid mantle of hair and skin. Your knowledge of pH will enable you to select products that will leave your hair and skin in as natural and healthy environment as possible.

The term alkaline refers to the ammonium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide (lye) present in a product. Its purpose is to raise the pH of a product so the chemical reaction will process rapidly. Because of its alkalinity it tends to strip the hair and scalp from its natural oils, this could be drying or even irritating to your hair and skin. Alkali is found in hair straightening products, hair color, soaps, most shampoos, and in general household cleaners.

It is important to remember that pH is logarithmic; each number multiplies itself by ten (x10). Example: pH 8 is ten (10x) times more alkali than pH 7. pH 14 is ten million (x10,000,000) times more alkali than pH 7. The same thing applies on the acidic side of the scale. For example, on the acidic side of the scale, pH 6 is ten (x10) times more acidic than pH 7. pH 5 is hundred (x100) times more acidic than pH 7, and so on.



Steve Tcherkezian
Japanese & Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening
(The Soft, Silky & Frizz-Free Hair Solution)
www.verticalsinhair.com
Contact Steve - Verticals in Hair
To contact Steve, you can either call or email him
Consultations by appointment only.
Phone: (416) 669-9118.
Email: steve@VerticalsInHair.com


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LOOK - What your weekly at-home hair care regimen should look-like
Post LOOK - What your weekly at-home hair care regimen should look-like
by Steve Tcherkezian on Thursday, 31.December 2015 12:42 AM

Here is how to Shampoo and Condition your hair the right way.


Detangle hair: Make sure all tangles are removed from your hair before you wet it. When you hair is tangled and water hits it, the tangles become locked-in an eventually causing knots. Brush it out gently before you get in the shower. First get a good detangling comb, they have very wide teeth. Mason Pearson Detangling Comb is the best comb money can buy. Comb your hair before you start to brush. Combing has to be done bottom up. That is to say, start to detangle your hair from the ends first and work up to the scalp. Go through some inches until all knots are combed out. After you detangled your hair by this method, use a brush to go through the whole length, top down. Do not brush abruptly. This will help shedding or “old hair” being loosened in the follicle to make way for tangle free. Basically, you are trying to avoid combing through tangles or creating more tangles.



Knotted hair caused by mechanical trauma
and towel ruffling.



If you’re using hair-styling products, you must change your shampoo routine. The mousse, wax and gel you apply in the morning will harden at the end of the day, so don’t brush your hair before shampooing in the evening. After you detangled your hair by this method, wet the hair and scalp thoroughly with warm water. Apply shampoo and wash while massaging the scalp. Don’t rub your hair in lather. When you are finished, keep the lather in place for around one minute. This will lift the styling chemicals from the hair. Rinse and apply conditioner or treatment.

Apply the treatment to damaged hair before shampooing. If your hair is damaged, wet the hair thoroughly and apply the treatment only to the ends for protection before shampooing. If your hair extends past the shoulder blade, apply treatment to the portion below the shoulder blade and gently rub the hair to let the nutrients penetrate. Be sure to do it in a gentle, soft action. For long hair, apply around 5cc or one tablespoon-full of treatment. If your hair is really messy today, separate it and comb each strand on its own.


Here is what your weekly at-home hair care regimen would look-like.

1. Shampoo, rinse, towel blot gently. Leave damp.

2. Intensive Treatment - apply and distribute evenly, comb through at one-inch parting detangling from the ends first; use Mason Pearson Detangling Comb. Mason Pearson combs are high quality combs with rounded soft edges and have no ridges in between the tooth of the comb. (Everyone should own a Mason Pearson Detangling Comb). Cover with plastic covering. Leave 10 minutes with heat (or use 5 minutes heat from a blow-dryer and 5 minutes without). Cool down, rinse, towel blot gently.

3. Conditioner - apply, distribute evenly. Rinse, towel blot gently. Leave damp. Always finish with a cool rinse, this helps close the cuticle of the hair and make it much shinier. Don’t rub or towel ruffle the hair; you will tear up the hair’s cuticle and loose shine and elasticity.

4. Leave-in Treatment - apply a small amount, distribute evenly throughout. Comb at one-inch parting, detangling from the ends first. Proceed with the styling technique of your choice. Note: If you iron your hair, it is imperative to use heat protecting lotion, such as ID.CARE Heat Silk Lotion or any high quality heat protector.

The idea is to follow steps 1, 2, 3 and 4 at least once a month. If you shampoo your hair more often than once a week, follow steps 1, 3 and 4 only. If you feel your hair is now slightly more damaged than its ever been, then do steps 1, 2, 3, 4 at least once a week, and until you feel your hair is doing better.



Steve Tcherkezian
Japanese & Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening
(The Soft, Silky & Frizz-Free Hair Solution)
www.verticalsinhair.com
Contact Steve - Verticals in Hair
To contact Steve, you can either call or email him
Consultations by appointment only.
Phone: (416) 669-9118.
Email: steve@VerticalsInHair.com


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LOOK - Air drying your hair after shampoo will cause more damage than blow drying
Post LOOK - Air drying your hair after shampoo will cause more damage than blow drying
by Steve Tcherkezian on Thursday, 31.December 2015 12:31 AM

Why blow-drying is preferable to air-drying. According to the Japanese instructors, blow-drying is always preferable to air-drying for one main reason. When the hair is wet, the water molecules fill the cracks in the cuticle and absorb into the hair. Like a sponge, the hair expands enough to accommodate the water. The water exerts a slight pressure from inside the hair which stresses the cuticle layer and lifts the cuticle outwards slightly. If the hair is in a stressed state long enough, the hair’s cuticle layer will split and peel up to relieve the pressure.

The cuticle is a hardened dead layer of protein, and once the stress fractures happens; there is no permanent repair solution. When the hair is blown dry using warm air, on a low setting, the water is evaporated out of the hair quicker, relieving the stress faster. It is very important to not rough up the hair while blow-drying, because that damages the cuticle, and it is recommended using the fingers only, blowing in a downward motion from roots to ends. If the temperature is too hot, that will not benefit the hair at all since it will dry out the outside of the cuticle very quickly, possibly burning it, while the water inside has not yet evaporated.

The water locked inside is evaporating out, re-moisturizing the cuticle and encouraging the fuzz. I choose to recommend blow-drying Japanese and Keratin Hair Straightening treated hair on low, in a downward motion. Do not iron if it doesn’t need extra smoothing and if it’s very straight, unless of course it’s time for a root touch-up and you need to smooth the hair for an occasion.



Cuticle damage caused by intense heat from
nozzle of hand held dryer.



Mechanical damage caused by flat iron.


It is very important to sleep on a slippery surface, such as a satin pillowcase. Some clients fit a slip over their pillows instead of a satin case. The reason for the satin pillowcase is because keeping the cuticle smooth, and flat and healthy is the first priority in maintaining healthy hair. When you destroy the cuticle, you speed the downfall of you hair’s health. The cuticle lies flat, overlapping, like shingles. When you rough up the cuticles, you destroy the hair. Sleeping on a satin pillowcase helps prevent the cuticle from getting beaten up during the night as the head moves around and puts pressure on the hair. Fabric such as flannel is the worst for the cuticle since it puts so much tension on the hair. It is also better for you skin in helping to prevent facial creases caused by the face laying in the same position for an extended time, squished in some unnatural way

After towel blotting your hair, apply a leave-in conditioner. Then blow-dry the nape first, leaving the area above the forehead second. The bottom part should be dried first, so that the top part does not absorb the moisture from the bottom. Always choose to blow-dry hair on low setting, and in a downward motion.

Armed with the language, we educate ourselves on certain subjects where we learn the fundamentals and disciplines related to hair. When we find a subject appealing, we want to learn more than just the basics, more than the fundamentals. We learn the disciplines, the proper mechanics, and we discipline ourselves to do it correctly. In essence, in order to master the subject, we do whatever it takes to own the information.

Blow-dryer setting: When the hair is wet, blow-drying at high temperature can cause volcanic effect inside the hair. The water molecules begin to boil; causing irreparable damage to the hair. Do not choose the highest setting. Always choose to blow-dry hair on medium setting, and in a downward motion. Once the hair is 80% dry, you can choose to go to higher setting.

So, you say to yourself, Where do I go from here? I understand the language, and now I know how to take better care and to create beautiful hair, based on hair that is in optimum condition. Simple, isn’t it?


Steve Tcherkezian
Japanese & Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening
(The Soft, Silky & Frizz-Free Hair Solution)
www.verticalsinhair.com
Contact Steve - Verticals in Hair
To contact Steve, you can either call or email him
Consultations by appointment only.
Phone: (416) 669-9118.
Email: steve@VerticalsInHair.com


Steve Tcherkezian

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LOOK - How to shampoo your hair the right way
Post LOOK - How to shampoo your hair the right way
by Steve Tcherkezian on Thursday, 31.December 2015 12:04 AM

Wet your hair as though you are soaking it. First, thoroughly saturate scalp and hair using warm or cool water (100°F or 38°C) (hot water tends to dry out hair and scalp). The primary objective of shampooing is to clean your scalp, not wrestle your hair, so concentrate on massaging gently and allow suds to be distributed throughout hair while rinsing. Wet your hair thoroughly in the shower. Some people say only cool water, some people say only warm. Single strand of hair is very fine. If you rinse your hair with hot water, it will cause the cuticle to peal. Also, essential oil will run out. If your hair is long, try to keep it straight while you wet it.



The main purpose of shampooing is to wash the scalp. The length of the hair doesn’t matter. If your hair is long, massaging the scalp with the fingers will also cause your entire head of hair to move. Since the hair is already receiving vibration and friction, rubbing and kneading it further in large amounts of lather will cause damage to the hair. You shampoo your hair almost each day, so master the correct shampooing technique to keep your hair looking healthy and lively.


Shampoo your scalp! Only lather the ends. Shampoo scalp for 2 minutes. It is not necessary to lather too much- this can cause damage to the hair’s cuticle. Proper way of shampooing is to shampoo your scalp. Put shampoo on your scalp, not on your hair. Apply shampoo from the nape, around the ears and hairline. Gently massage the scalp throughout your entire head. Keeping your scalp clean and healthy is very important. The primary objective of shampooing is to clean your scalp, not wrestle your hair, so concentrate on massaging gently and allow suds to be distributed throughout hair while rinsing. It’s not necessary to do the “rinse and repeat” routine unless you have an oily scalp.



It is not necessary to lather up so much! Too much lathering can cause damage to the cuticle of the hair. Work it gently through your hair starting at the root area and moving down toward the ends. Remember, the cuticle layer (outer most layer) of your hair grows out in this direction.


Gently rinse your hair. Just as you wet your hair in the first step, trap the water and massage with it. Do not use strong water pressure to rinse your hair. Now, squeeze the excess water from your hair. Apply a sufficient amount of treatment to where your hair is driest first. For most people, this means the ends. Massage the product into the hair.




Rinse thoroughly. Excess shampoo residue can cause hair to be dull and flat looking. Remember, you’re always aiming the water away from your scalp toward the ends. Running your fingers gently.


Certain kind of styling materials can change the way you shampoo the hair. Styling materials used will harden up throughout the day. It should be thoroughly rinsed out before applying the shampoo, but never brush it out before wetting. Apply shampoo, gently lather and massage your entire scalp. Let it sit with lather for 1 minute. This will cleanse the build-up of the styling material on your hair. After rinsing it out, apply conditioning treatment.




Hair is always loosing protein through daily abuse. Treatments revitalize and replenish lost protein and nutrients in hair. It is necessary to apply Treatment at least once a week.

Long hair tends to get damaged easily. Any hair passed shoulder length can be considered damaged. Hair is a build-up of dead cells, so it does not have the ability to heal and revitalize its own damaged areas. Natural oils from your scalp can only reach to your ear line. If you keep this in mind every time you shampoo your hair, it will make a lot of difference.

Treatment is applied to replenish damaged hair with nutrients. The essential complex contained in your treatment product will penetrate each strand of hair through the cuticle and replenish lost protein. I recommend that those with medium to long hair use one treatment for each shampoo. The amount applied varies, but roughly one teaspoon for a medium length hair and 2 teaspoon for long hair. Apply to your hair below the ears without diluting. Make doubly sure the hair is not too wet.

For damaged hair apply treatment before shampooing. If your hair is damaged, wet your hair thoroughly and apply conditioner to protect your hair before you shampoo. Apply conditioner only on the ends. For hair longer than shoulder line, apply conditioner and let it penetrate into the hair as you gently massage your hair. The amount of the conditioner is about the size of tea spoon for long hair.

If you have bleached or colored hair, I recommend that you use a treatment after every shampoo.

Now is the time to comb your hair. It’s easy to get a comb through hair with Treatment in it. Start at the ends, not at the root area. This helps remove knots and tangles quickly. Work your way up the shaft. Now, leave it on for a while. Combing your hair out should be much easier. Process 5 to 10 minutes, rinse.



Finally, Apply Conditioner in one hand and rub palms together to evenly distribute. Apply conditioner from the middle of the hair shaft down to ends. Do not massage conditioner onto scalp unless scalp is dry. Comb through hair to distribute evenly. Leave conditioner on hair—it only takes a few seconds. Rinse thoroughly. It’s important to rinse shampoo and conditioner from your scalp. Stand under the shower and gently lift hair to permit the water to reach the scalp. Hair will be thoroughly rinsed when it feels consistently clean as you run your fingers from scalp to ends.

Not many people know the true role that conditioners plays. A "Conditioner" is a surface active rinse, so it acts topically just like a make-up and/or a lip-stick. Or you can think of it as a skin lotion for the hair. Just as you apply skin lotion to firm and tighten your skin after washing the face, conditioner closes the opened cuticles and changes the hair’s pH value to a weak acidity. Normally, Conditioners have a lower pH value to help close and smoothen the cuticle layers and to give it shine. A Treatment on the other hand has the vital moisturizers, lipids and amino acids. It boosts, seals, enhances and replaces depleted strength and reinforces the internal hair fiber. Many believe applying a lot of conditioner will make the hair shinier, but this is wrong. Conditioner only needs to adhere to the hair surface.


After shampooing, towel blot excess moisture out; do not rub down with a towel. Gently blot the moisture at the ends to avoid friction between strands of hair that will cause cuticle damage. Dry your hair with a towel not to “wipe” but to “absorb moisture. Never rub your hair forcibly by wrapping your head with a towel. The water attached to the hair will travel down naturally after a while, so gently pressing a towel over the hair will remove moisture effectively. Don’t rub or knead? This is an iron rule that applies to every step of the shampooing process. Wet hair is very fragile and prone to damage. As you dry the hair, the cuticle closes and the tensile strength returns. This will also reduce the time the hair in its weakened state; making the hair stronger and less prone to breakage.




Long hair tends to get damaged very easily. Any hair passed shoulder length can be considered damaged. Hair is a build-up of dead cells, so it does not have the ability to heal and revitalize its own damaged areas. Natural oils from your scalp can only reach to your ear line. If you keep this in mind every time you shampoo your hair, it will make a lot of difference.

The portion around 10 centimeters from the scalp is young hair with little damage, but the remaining portion has been wind-blown, washed in shampoo and rubbed with towels for many years and should therefore be worn to some extent. If the hair is long, the natural oils secreted from the scalp can’t travel to the ends, so the hair will become excessively dry over time if nothing is done.

Short hair of up to about 10 centimeters has plenty of natural oil. Since the hair is young and strong, handling it a little roughly won’t cause too much damage. However, this is not the case with hair of over 10 cm. Ideally, the portion below 10 cm from the scalp should not be touched during shampooing. Of course that isn’t possible, but taking heed of the aforementioned points will certainly change your hair for the better. Let’s start a new regimen today!


Some people let their hair air-dry, but this seemingly natural approach is really not good for the hair. After thoroughly absorbing moisture with a towel, apply ID.CARE heat silk lotion, and detangling Cream over your hair (ask your stylist for the recommended hair care regimen). Start from the nape area, with the portion above the forehead dried last, so that the top portion will not absorb all the moisture. If the top of your hair is always flat no matter how long you blow-dry, it is because the bottom part is still wet and water is being channeled upward. When the scalp is completely dry and the hair is 80-percent dry, style your hair into the desired look.





Steve Tcherkezian
Japanese & Brazilian Keratin Hair Straightening
(The Soft, Silky & Frizz-Free Hair Solution)
www.verticalsinhair.com
Contact Steve - Verticals in Hair
To contact Steve, you can either call or email him
Consultations by appointment only.
Phone: (416) 669-9118.
Email: steve@VerticalsInHair.com


Steve Tcherkezian

Steve Tcherkezian

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Posts: 2488

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